17 July 2017

Dear Barb,

I LOL-ed out loud when you said that everything is 'it' for me! (does that make it LOLL - laugh out loud loud?)

Your point regarding coaching the kids in netball is so true that it kind of scares me. Recently I found out that one of my friends who graduated as a dentist four years ago decided to throw it all away and become a science teacher! What if I decide that I just want to play netball with all my bubsies and put my medical degree behind me?

From the age of fourteen, until I left for University at the age of nineteen, I would spend every week coaching kids in either basketball or table tennis. At that age, I just did it for my CV and to get more extracurricular activities in the bag for when I was going to apply for medical school. So, at that age, I just did my job, and came home. But now, every minute I spend with these kids is so meaningful, it's extremely satisfying to see these kids working on their fitness and waking up early to 'sports'. I am playing a small role in getting these kids sportsing early in the morning and staying physically fit. That is extremely satisfying, because I'm actively doing my part for my community. When I see the kids leaving to go home after a fun session, and I see they're drenched in sweat and excited to come back the next day for more, I feel like I've done a great job, and that satisfaction is unbeatable. (unless you send me a bag of prawn crackers and a can of Dr.Pepper, of course)

What is also satisfying to know is that I managed to speak in Malyalam quite decently in our latest episode with Anjali. Even though it was just one word, I still felt the need to practice a thousand times in front of the mirror. But what I should have really practiced is the rest of the questions we prepared for her. I feel very disappointed in myself this week, Barb. This was a big interview, and a part of me feels like I totally blew it. From my side, I did all the prep, the research, and I even recited the prepared questions the night before (something I don't usually do, because it doesn't feel natural to me during the actual interview).

Ask me to wake up at 5am for a run?
EASY.

Ask me to wake up at 5am to study?
EASY.

Wake up at 5am to speak to Anjali Menon?
OMG. WHAT DO I DO?

Firstly, I would like to make it clear that apart from my nerves, I was terribly frightened of waking up my Dad so early in the morning, and even more frightened that my Mum would forget that I was conducting this interview and she would walk in with the aarti and sing her bhajans really loud. So that's one reason why I sounded very mellow and toned down at the beginning of the interview.

Why did I say succex instead of success?

I DON'T KNOW. I'VE SAID THE WORD SUCCESS A MILLION TIMES IN MY LIFE, BUT DURING THE INTERVIEW, I HAD TO MESS IT UP.

So, now my dreams of Anjali casting me in a movie are definitely over, because I'm sure she doubts my ability to read script. Great.

I guess I'll just be a doctor.

And as for your mother-in-law, I'm happy for both of you.